N Kaushik

When should you use curly braces for ES6 imports

September 05, 2021

When should you use curly braces for ES6 imports:

If you are writing code in javascript and if ES6 is supported in that project, you might have come across imports that are imported in files using a curly braces like:

import {functionName} from './path/to/util';

and we can also import without using any curly braces like:

import utils from './path/to/util';

Anything that we are importing in a file needs to be exported from another file. There are two types of exports:

  • Named Export and
  • Default Export

Named Export:

Named exports are imported using curly braces. We can export multiple things from one file as like below:

export const myConst = 10;
export const myFunc = () => {};

These exports are imported using curly braces.

import {myConst, myFunc} from './path/to/file';

or we can import these in different lines:

import {myConst} from './path/to/file';
import {myFunc} from './path/to/file';

Default export:

Default export is imported without using any curly braces. We can have only one default export in one file:

export default myFunc;

It can be imported without using any curly braces:

import myFunc from './path/to/file';

Can we have both named or default export in the same file:

We can have both named and default export in the same file. For example:

export const myConst = 10;
export const myFunc = () => {};

const anotherFunc = () => {}

export default anotherFunc;

We can import these similarly:

import {myConst, myFunc} from './path/to/file';
import anotherFunc from './path/to/file';

Renaming while importing:

We can rename while importing :

import {myConst as c} from './path/to/file';

That’s all !!


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